New Food Allergy Prevention Guidelines | Ready, Set, Food!
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Pediatric Allergist
“I recommend early and sustained allergen introduction for all babies starting at 4-6 months of age, based on the current guidelines.”
Jonathan Spergel, M.D.
Board-Certified Pediatric Allergist, Head of Allergy at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Allergist
“All babies should start early and sustained food allergen introduction at 4-6 months.”
Gary Rachelefsky, M.D.
Board-Certified Pediatric Allergist, Former President of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI)
Read Dr. Rachelefsky's Article
Pediatrician
“I recommend Ready, Set, Food! for my patients because it's the easiest and safest way for parents to reduce their baby's risk of developing food allergies.”
Jessica Hochman, M.D.
Board-Certified Pediatrician
Pediatrician
“I recommend Ready, Set, Food! to all my patients as early as 4 months of age and I think this is going to make a real difference. I think this is a real game changer in the pediatric world.”
Robert Hamilton, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Board-Certified Pediatrician, star of "How to Calm a Crying Baby" (32M views on YouTube)
Read Dr. Hamilton's Article
Dietitian
“Ready, Set, Food! allows parents to support the baby led weaning process (and all other feeding routines) while still achieving all the preventative benefits of early allergen introduction.”
Whitney Crouch, RDN
Registered Dietitian & Clinical Nutritionist
Read Whitney Crouch's Article
Lactation Consultant / RN
“We chose to add Ready, Set, Food! to our highly curated group of recommended products because it gives mothers the choice to EBF and also introduce allergenic foods and it’s organic and all-natural.”
Corky Harvey, RN, IBCLC, MS
Founder of The Pump Station & Nurtury
Read Corky Harvey's Article
Pediatric Allergist
“I recommend early and sustained allergen introduction for all babies starting at 4-6 months of age, based on the current guidelines.”
Jonathan Spergel, M.D.
Board-Certified Pediatric Allergist, Head of Allergy at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Allergist
“All babies should start early and sustained food allergen introduction at 4-6 months.”
Gary Rachelefsky, M.D.
Board-Certified Pediatric Allergist, Former President of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI)
Read Dr. Rachelefsky's Article
Pediatrician
“I recommend Ready, Set, Food! for my patients because it's the easiest and safest way for parents to reduce their baby's risk of developing food allergies.”
Jessica Hochman, M.D.
Board-Certified Pediatrician
Pediatrician
“I recommend Ready, Set, Food! to all my patients as early as 4 months of age and I think this is going to make a real difference. I think this is a real game changer in the pediatric world.”
Robert Hamilton, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Board-Certified Pediatrician, star of "How to Calm a Crying Baby" (32M views on YouTube)
Read Dr. Hamilton's Article
Dietitian
“Ready, Set, Food! allows parents to support the baby led weaning process (and all other feeding routines) while still achieving all the preventative benefits of early allergen introduction.”
Whitney Crouch, RDN
Registered Dietitian & Clinical Nutritionist
Read Whitney Crouch's Article
Lactation Consultant / RN
“We chose to add Ready, Set, Food! to our highly curated group of recommended products because it gives mothers the choice to EBF and also introduce allergenic foods and it’s organic and all-natural.”
Corky Harvey, RN, IBCLC, MS
Founder of The Pump Station & Nurtury
Read Corky Harvey's Article

Clinical Studies & Medical Guidelines

AAP Updated Guidelines: Timing of Introduction of Allergenic Complementary Foods and Food Allergy on Infants & Children

On March 18, 2019, the AAP released new guidelines for preventing childhood food allergies, based on a review of all current evidence from major clinical studies.

FDA Qualified Health Claim on Benefits of Early Peanut Introduction

The Food and Drug Administration issued a qualified health claim in September 2017 acknowledging the link between early peanut introduction and reduced risk of developing peanut allergy.

Addendum Guidelines for the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in the United States

NIAID-Sponsored Expert Panel provides three guidelines for the early introduction of peanut-containing foods in infants, based on their level of risk for developing peanut allergy.

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Allergy Prevention Guidelines

Recommendations for the introduction of highly allergenic foods, diet during pregnancy, and breastfeeding.

Preventing Food Allergy In Your Baby: A Summary For Parents

From around 6 months of age (but not before 4 months), introduce complementary foods (solids), including foods known to cause food allergies, alongside continued breastfeeding.

Timing of Introduction of Allergenic Solids for Infants at High Risk

There is emerging evidence that early food introduction, between 4 to 6 months of age, may have a role in preventing food allergy, particularly for egg and peanut, in high-risk infants.

Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention Guidelines

All infants should be given allergenic solid foods including peanut butter, cooked egg, dairy and wheat products in the first year of life. This includes infants at high risk of allergy.

Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP)

The first large-scale study (640 babies) that showed peanut consumption in high-risk infants between 4 and 11 months of age reduced the rate of peanut allergy by 81%.

Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT)

Study of 1,300 babies with no risk factors who were given 6 allergens (peanut, egg, milk, white fish, sesame, and wheat) from 3-6 months of age. Showed >67% reduction in egg and cow’s milk allergies.

Prevention of Egg Allergy in High-Risk Infants with Eczema (PETIT)

Study of 147 infants with eczema who were given cooked egg from 4-10 months in a step-wise (low to high dose) dosing method. Showed early egg exposure reduced risk of egg allergy by 79%.

Early exposure to cow’s milk protein is protective against IgE-mediated cow’s milk protein allergy

Prospective study of >10,000 families showed significant correlation of timing of cow's milk introduction with risk of developing cow's milk allergy.

Educational Videos

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